Strategic Plan - Executive Summary

Article Index

Executive Summary

Purpose

The National Strategic Education Plan (1389-1393/2010-2014) sets out the policies and objectives of the education system of Afghanistan to be achieved during the next five years. These policies and objectives have been developed based on the national and international commitments of the government and on the basis of the needs of the education system in Afghanistan. The NESP reflects the ambitions and hopes of the people and students of Afghanistan. This plan has been developed in the light of the results achieved and lessons learned from the implementation of NESP (1385/2006)-1389/2010). The plan is structured around five priority programmes designed to enable the Ministry of Education to achieve the main objectives of the education system and contribute to the economic and socio-cultural development of the country, as well as its political stability and security.

Vision

Our vision is to develop human capital based on Islamic principles, national and international commitments and respect for human rights by providing equitable access to quality education for all to enable them to actively participate in sustainable development, economic growth, and stability and security of Afghanistan. To do this the Ministry must evolve into a modern, effective, fully funded and accountable public institution that facilitates education opportunities for children and adults, without discrimination, across Afghanistan.

Objectives for 1399 (2020):

The goals set out in this strategic plan were established in order to keep the education system on track toward achieving the Afghanistan Millennium Development Goals for 1399 (2020) and the Ministry’s longer-term objectives. By 1399 (2020):

  • Gross enrollment rates in Basic Education for boys and girls will increase to 104% and 103% respectively; and the net enrollment rates will increase for boys and girls to 98%.
  • The number of students in Islamic Education will increase to around a half a million (at least 40 % female).
  • At least 95% of teachers will have successfully passed the national competency test.
  • The national literacy rate will be 75%.
  • 12% of basic education graduates will continue their education in Technical and Vocational Education programs.

Situation in 1380 (2001)

  • Less than a million boys were enrolled in 3,400 general schools taught by 20,700 male teachers. The education system was not responsive to the needs. Girls and many boys did not have access to education.
  • Four Teacher Training Colleges (TTCs) were functional in four out of 30 provinces with a total of 190 male students and 50 male lecturers. Female students did not have access to TTCs.
  • 38 Technical and Vocational Education and Training schools were partly active with only 1,510 male students and 550 instructors.
  • 2,000 literacy courses were providing literacy to only 22,000 male adults.
  • The curriculum was out of date and politicized: several versions of textbooks were in use promoting a culture of violence.

Our current situation 1387 (2008)

  • The number of students in General Education schools has increased from 2.3 million in 1381 (2002) to 6.2 million students (36% females) in 1387 (2008), but Lack of security, poverty and lack of schools or educational services are the main obstacles to increase the enrollment in general schools.
  • Of the 158,000 teachers in 1387 (2008) only 29% of them are women. The shortage of female teachers is one of the main obstacles to increasing girls’ enrollment.
  • The number of schools in General Education has increased from 6,039 in 1381 (2002) to 10,998 in 1387 (2008).
  • According to the MoE Security Department (1388/2009), 481 schools were either closed or burned by the insurgents and consequently 300,000 children have lost access to education.
  • By 1387(2008), 511 Islamic institutes (41 Dar-ul-Ulums1, 369 Madrasa2, 84 Dar-ul-Huffaz3 and 17 outreach schools) had been established with more than 106,000 students enrolled.

Our current situation 1387 (2008)

  • The number of students in General Education schools has increased from 2.3 million in 1381 (2002) to 6.2 million students (36% females) in 1387 (2008), but Lack of security, poverty and lack of schools or educational services are the main obstacles to increase the enrollment in general schools.
  • Of the 158,000 teachers in 1387 (2008) only 29% of them are women. The shortage of female teachers is one of the main obstacles to increasing girls’ enrollment.
  • The number of schools in General Education has increased from 6,039 in 1381 (2002) to 10,998 in 1387 (2008).
  • According to the MoE Security Department (1388/2009), 481 schools were either closed or burned by the insurgents and consequently 300,000 children have lost access to education.
  • By 1387(2008), 511 Islamic institutes (41 Dar-ul-Ulums1, 369 Madrasa2, 84 Dar-ul-Huffaz3 and 17 outreach schools) had been established with more than 106,000 students enrolled.
  • The Ministry has developed a new curriculum framework and syllabi for General and Islamic Education. Based on the new curriculum, new textbooks for Primary Education have been developed, printed and distributed. The development of Secondary and Islamic Education textbooks is in progress and these are expected to be completed and printed in 1388-9 (2009-10).
  • The number of student in Teacher Training Colleges (TTCs) was around 33,000 in 1387 (2008) – of which 13,000 (38%) were women.
  • Enrolment in technical and vocational education has increased from approximately 9,000 in 1385 (2006) to 16,000 in 1387 (2008) with 2,500 females (16%).
  • In 1387 (2008), a total of 15,500 literacy courses were conducted and 78 literacy schools with 2,900 permanent teachers, of which 34% are women, were established. According to the new literacy policy, the focus for literacy training has shifted to rural areas where illiteracy rates are higher.
  • The literacy rate for the population aged 15 and over has reached 26% (39% for men and 12% for women). It is estimated that 9.5 million Afghans were illiterate in 1387 (2008).
  • Despite the construction and rehabilitation of more than 19,000 classrooms over the last three years, in 1387 (2008), still only 55% of schools have usable buildings.
  • The new Education Law of Afghanistan was developed and approved by the Cabinet in 1387 (2008), and awaits approval by the Parliament.
  • The Educational Management Information System (EMIS) was developed and the first comprehensive school survey was carried out in 1386 (2007) and updated in 1387 (2008).
  • Implementation of the new Tashkil (organizational structure of the Ministry) and Pay and Grade system for salaries has begun.

1 Islamic studies institutes (grade 13-14)
2 Islamic studies schools (grade 7-12)
3 Schools/centers for memorizing holy Quran (grade 1-12)  

The Education System in 1393 (2014)

  • 10 million students will be enrolled in General Education Schools and the number of schools will reach 16,500. The net enrolment rate of girls and boys in Basic Education will increase to 60% and 75% and gross enrollment to 72% and 90%, respectively.
  • The number of students in Islamic schools and Dar-ul-Ulums will increase to approximately 200,000 and the number of schools will reach 1,000.
  • Access to technical and vocational education will increase by expanding TVET regional institutes from 16 to 32; TVET provincial schools from 32 to 102; and establishing 364 TVET district schools. The number of students in technical and vocational education will increase to 150,000 with 30 % female students.
  • Literacy courses provided for 3.6 million literacy learners (of whom 60% will be women), with an emphasis on rural areas and increased attention to the needs of adult people with disabilities and special needs.
  • The curriculum, syllabi and textbooks of General and Islamic Education will be updated to meet the developing needs.
  • At least 80% of teachers will have passed the national competency test.
  • Seventy-five percent of general and Islamic schools, 100% of technical and vocational schools, 75% of TTCs will have useable buildings.
  • Sufficient ordinary and development budget will be provided for all education programs with a ratio of 75% for salaries and 25% for non-salary costs.
  • The new Structure “Tashkil” will be implemented based on public administration reforms at central, provincial and district levels.
  • A comprehensive EMIS system will be functional at central, provincial and district level and will facilitate informed decision making, transparency and accountability of education services being provided.